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Driving Offenses

Reckless Driving

Reckless driving is defined as driving with “willful or wanton disregard for the safety of persons or property.” Conviction for this crime will also result in suspension of your license or privilege to drive for at least 30 days.
RCW 46.61.500

Reckless driving and racing are both crimes in Washington State. They are called “gross-misdemeanors” and punishable from 0-365 days in jail and a fine of $0-$5000.

License Suspension: If convicted, both reckless driving and racing convictions lead to an automatic license suspension of 30 days. This suspension will take place at a minimum of 45 days after sentencing.

SR-22 Insurance: Insurance: If your license is suspended, the state will require to have SR-22 insurance for 3 years.

Negligent driving — First degree

Negligent driving in the first occurs when a driver operates a motor vehicle in a manner that is both “negligent and endangers or is likely to endanger any person or property and exhibits the effects of having consumed liquor or an illegal drug.” Negligent Driving in the first degree is a misdemeanor. There is no license suspension penalty for a conviction of this offense.
RCW 46.61.5249

Negligent driving — Second degree

Negligent driving in the second degree can be charged when a driver has operated a motor vehicle in a manner that is both “negligent and endangers or is likely to endanger any person or property.” Negligent Driving in the second degree is a non-criminal traffic infraction and is subject to a fine.
RCW 46.61.525

Hit and Run

a) Hit and Run– Attended:

The law requires a driver who knows he or she has been in an accident with an occupied vehicle to stop and provide his or her name, address, license, insurance company, and insurance policy number. If a driver leaves the scene without providing this information, they can be charged with Hit and Run– Attended, which is a gross misdemeanor. If convicted of this offense, your license will be revoked.
RCW 46.52.020

b) Hit and Run– Unattended:

The law requires a driver who knows he or she has been involved in an accident that damages property (this could be an unoccupied car or some other property) to stop and provide his or her name, address, license, insurance company, and insurance policy number. If a driver is leaves the scene without providing this information, they can be charged with Hit and Run– Unattended, which is a simple misdemeanor. Your driver’s license is not revoked upon conviction for Hit and Run– Unattended.
RRCW 46.52.010

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